Patricia Adams | HOST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trish Adams is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow, RMIT University School of Art, Melbourne. Through her research and artworks Trish poses questions about what it means to be human in the twenty-first century, and the ways in which our understanding of ourselves will be changed by contemporary biotechnical developments. Trish has published her research and presented at conferences such as: New Constellations: Art, Science & Society, M.C.A. Sydney, 2006; Perth Digital Art & Culture Conference, 2007; ISEA2008, Singapore; Eye of the Storm, Tate Britain, U.K. 2009; Virtual Anatomies, The University of Queensland, 2011; ISEA2011, Istanbul, Turkey; Rewire2011, Liverpool, U.K and the Transdisciplinary Imaging 2012 Conference, Melbourne.

 

Josephine Anstey, Dave Pape, Devin Wilson | Improvising Consciousness: The Davian Turn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Josephine Anstey and Dave Pape are Associate Professors in the Media Study Department and members of the Intermedia Performance Studio, University at Buffalo. Anstey’s main creative and research focus is the production of interactive fiction/drama and intermedia performance. Her work has shown at the Ars Electronica Center, the Museum of Modern Art, and widely in the US, Europe and Japan. Pape works in the creation of interactive virtual environments, as well as the development of tools for computer art and performance. His interactive environments and videos have shown at the Ars Electronica Center, the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, the Smithsonian Museum and numerous computing conferences and art festivals. Devin Wilson is a musician and experimental game designer. Studying towards an MFA in the University at Buffalos Department of Media Study, he explores the rhetorical and expressive potential of games and other interactive media.

 

Benjamin David Robert Bogart & Philippe Pasquier | Dreaming Machine #3  (prototype 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben Bogart is an artist and scholar whose work intersects cultural production, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. His series of “Context Machines” are site-specific artworks that autonomously create landscape representations of the sites in which they are situated. These machines exploit artificial intelligence methods to enable their generative and creative behaviour. A recent subset of this series are a set of “Dreaming Machines” whose generative processes are computational models of bio-psychological conceptions of perception, mental imagery, mind-wandering, dreaming and creativity. “Dreaming Machines” learn from the visual world and their dreams are unconstrained simulations of reality. Ben holds a Masters of Science in Interactive Arts and Technology from Simon Fraser University, and is currently a Ph.D. Can- didate in the School of Interactive Arts and Technology. He has exhibited in Canada, the U.S.A., Spain, Finland, Norway, China, Brazil, Ireland and Germany; and has received grants from the Canada Council from the Arts and scholarships from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

 

Chris Bowman | Fold #1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris has taught extensively in Visual Communication and is currently Director of the Master of Animation in the Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building, University of Technology Sydney. Chris is an internationally-recognised production designer, artist, writer, director and teacher who works with animation, film, and convergent media display systems. Chris graduated with a first class BA honours degree in Film and Animation from Liverpool School of Art + Design (Liverpool John Moores University, 1980) and completed his MA in Film and Television at the Royal College of Art (1984). Chris has directed and produced award winning animated and experimental art films and he regularly exhibits his screen media work in Australia.

 

Sean Clark | Dropsketch Installation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sean Clark is a digital artist, a researcher at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK, and the director of web/mobile developer Cuttlefish. In his arts work he is inspired by systems theory, the nature of interactivity and creative explorations of flow and connectedness.

 

Arne Eigenfeldt | Generating Electronica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of live electroacoustic music, and a researcher into intelligent realtime music systems. His music has been performed around the world, and his collaborations range from Persian Tar masters to contemporary dance companies to musical robots. His research has been presented at conferences such as ICMC, NIME, ICCC, ISEA, ISMIR, EMS, and SMC. He is an associate professor of music and technology at Simon Fraser University, Canada, and is the co-director of the Metacreation research group (metacreation.net), which aims to endow computers with creative behaviour.

 

Shannon Novak | Site Weave

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shannon Novak’s is an artist based in Auckland, New Zealand whose practice focuses on the idea that “sound is a part of all that exists”. Novak explores this idea through synesthesia or a mixing of the senses where he interprets shape as sound, sound as shape, colour as sound, and sound as colour. These explorations have taken the form of painting, sculpture, and installation in New Zealand and around the world including Australia, Italy, Belgium, Wales, Nigeria, Iceland, South Africa, USA and UAE. Novak is currently a postgraduate student at Elam School of Fine Arts, Auckland University, New Zealand.

 

Barbara Rauch | Horned friendship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Barbara Rauch is an artist practitioner and research academic. She is a Digital Futures Initiative hire, in a tenure-track position at OCAD University, Toronto in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies and Graduate Studies. Rauch is the Graduate Program Director for the Interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Art, Media & Design (IAMD). She is the Director of the e_Motion Research Project in the Digital Media Research and Innovation Institute, researching the development of emotion with the facilitation of data analysis, using advanced technology in 3D printing, sculpting and analysis.

 

Martin Rieser | Exodus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Rieser has worked in the field of interactive arts for many years. He is research Professor in the Institute of Creative Technologies in The Faculty of Art Design and Humanities at De Montfort. His art practice in internet art and interactive narrative installations has been seen around the world including Cannes; Holland, Paris; Vienna, Thessaloniki, London, Germany, Milan and Melbourne, Australia. He has published numerous essays and books on digital art including New Screen Media: Cinema/ Art/Narrative (BFI/ZKM, 2002), and has recently edited The Mobile Audience, a book on mobile and locative technology and art from Rodopi.

 

SCISSORS | Thomas Marcusson, LiviaGiocomini, Stephanie Rajalingam and Ernesto Sumarkho | The Worry Ball

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scissors is a band of directors, designers, writers and outsiders doing their thing somewhere at the crossroads between design, film and art. We collaborate across all disciplines to create work that is conceptually intriguing and visually stunning.

Thomas is a contemporary artist (www.thomasmarcusson.com) exploring the nexus of science and culture, often wrapped around a small technological invention. Thomas graduated from UTS with a bachelor of arts with 1st class honours, and has had work exhibited in the Science gallery in Dublin, the Eyebeam gallery in New York and in the Powerhouse museum in Sydney. His latest artwork, the Worryball, is produced through the creative collective Scissors (www.scissors.cc), and involved co-artists Stephanie Rajalingam, Ernesto Sumarkho and Livia Giacomini. The Worryball is an interactive sculpture, consisting of more than 5000 Guatemalan worrydolls, that records and broadcasts ‘worries’ from all around the world. (www.theworryball.com)

 

Ernest Edmonds | Shaping Form Sussex

Digital film of a generative artwork

Shaping Form is a representation of computed life, moving and changing of its own accord but maturing and developing as a result of the movement of audiences. The shaping of the form is a never-ending process of computed development.  Shaping Form Sussex (the movie) can be viewed simply as a generative abstract film dealing with colour and simple shapes in a form of visual music.